Monthly Archives: May 2017

New age of livestock medication arrives

By |2018-01-14T16:58:25+00:00May 31st, 2017|Categories: Farm Services|Tags: , , , |

World-first technology has arrived in the south-west that is revolutionising the way farmers administer and record drugs given to their livestock. The system sees an end to unreliable, inaccurate injector guns and replaces them with an automatic, traceable, tamper-proof applicator that prevents underdosing and overdosing. The Vet Group managing director Matt Makin said the automed

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New hip lifting device

By |2018-01-13T18:10:20+00:00May 25th, 2017|Categories: Farm Services|Tags: , , , , |

No matter how hard we try, most dairy farmers will experience the need to nurse down cows at some point throughout the calving season. Apart from high quality bedding, shelter, rolling, food, water and anti-inflammatory medications, it is also necessary on occasion to lift these cows using a tractor or other device. Alternatively, it is

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Calves and cold stress

By |2018-01-13T18:10:37+00:00May 20th, 2017|Categories: CalfWise, Farm Services|Tags: , , , , , , |

Like most baby mammals, calves are less capable of regulating their body temperature than adults. If a calf feels cold stress, its growth rate will slow down and it will be more susceptible to health issues. Animals have a thermo neutral zone where they are at a comfortable temperature and don’t need to use any

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Calf starters

By |2018-01-13T18:10:48+00:00May 19th, 2017|Categories: CalfWise, Farm Services|Tags: , , , , |

A dairy cow’s stomach is made up of four parts and relies heavily on fermentation for the digestive process (rumination). The four stomach parts are reticulum, rumen, omasum and abomasum (see figure 3 below). The reticulum and the rumen is where fermentation occur, the omasum absorbs water and minerals from the rumen, and the abomasum

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After calving – minimise cow health issues

By |2018-01-13T18:10:58+00:00May 5th, 2017|Categories: Farm Services|Tags: , , |

The transition period (3 weeks prior and 3 weeks post calving) is one of the most critical times in the production cycle of an adult dairy cow. Cows are at a high risk of a number of metabolic disorders that can affect dairy farm profitability. The significant nutrient requirements for the rapidly growing calf and

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